25th US Infantry Division "Tropic Lightning"
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Divisional information
Divisional troops
Attachments
Assignments
Detachments
Command Posts


Divisional information Top

History
26.08.1941 Constituted
01.10.1941 Activated
On October the 1st, 1941, the Hawaiian Division was inactivated and split to form the new 24th "Victory" Infantry Division and the 25th "Tropical Lightning" Infantry Division. The Hawaiian Division consited of 4 Infantry Regiments, the 19th, 21st, 27th and 35th. The 27th and 35th Infantry Regiments were assigned to the 25th Division, the other two to the 24th Division. Because an infantry divison in 1941 consited of three infantry regiments, the 298th Infantry Regiment of the Hawaiian National Guard was called into federal service. Later, in 1942, the 298th Infantry Regiment was replaced by the 161st Infantry Regiment of the Washington National Guard.
On December 7th, 1941 during the attack on Pearl Harbor, both the 24th and 25th Divisions returned fire to the Japanese planes attacking there island. After the attack, the 25th Division occupied the South Sector of the Oahu Island. During the next year the division defended there sector against another possible Japanese (land)attack. During that year (1942) the units of the division also trained for jungle warfare.
At the end of November 1942 the division was shipped out to Guadalcanal. The division was shipped in three groups and was finally deployed on Guadalcanal on the 4th of January, 1943. During the month of January the division was engaged in heavy fighting with the enemy on Guadalcanal. The division participated in the capture of Mount Austen at the end of the month. The next couple of months, the division was assigned to defend Guadalcanal.
In July 1943 the division was send to the Solomons Islands. From July till October it was used in the attacks on New Georgia, Vella LaVella and Kolombangara. From the middle of the month (October), the division was shipped back to Guadalcanal. Then it was moved to New Zealand and finally to New Caledonia, where it arrived somewhere in the month of February 1944. The rest of the year was used for training.
On the 11th of January 1945, the division landed on Luzon, the Philippines. During the Luzon campaign the division was creditted for 165 days of continuous combat. It was finally taken back from the front line on 30 June 1945 for some well deserved resting. The division was used as part of the Occupation Force in Japan.

Unit Insignias & Nickname
Shoulder Sleeve Insignia The divisional nickname, "Tropic Lightning", was earned during the fightings on Guadalcanal. Both in the Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (left) and the Distinctive Unit Insignia (right), is this "Tropic Lightning" representated. The Hawaiian origin of the division can be found in the vulcano and the palm leaves in the Distinctive Unit Insignia (right).
Both pictures: US Army Center of Military History
Distinctive Unit Insignia

Unit Decorations
Philippine Presidential Unit Citation for 17 October 1944 to 4 July 1945
Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for Masan-Chinju
Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for Munsan-Ni
Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for Vietnam 1966-1968
Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for Vietnam 1968-1970
Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for Vietnam 1966-1970
Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for Vietnam 1969

Individual Awards
Medal of Honor6
Distinguished Service Cross72
Distinguished Service Medal3
Silver Star622
Legion of Merit100
Distinguished Flying Cross1
Soldiers Medal40
Bronze Star1394
Air Medal147

Medal of Honor Recipients
FOURNIER, William G. [posthumously]
Rank and organization: Sergeant, U. S. Army, Company M, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: 10 January 1943, Mount Austen, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.
Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sergeant Fournier was leader of a machine-gun section charged with the protection of other battalion units, his group was attacked by a superior number of Japanese, his gunner killed, his assistant gunner wounded, and an adjoining guncrew put out of action. Ordered to withdraw from this hazardous position, Seargeant Fournier refused to retire but rushed forward to the idle gun and, with the aid of another soldier who joined him, held up the machinegun by the tripod to increase its field action. They opened fire and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy. While so engaged both these gallant soldiers were killed, but their sturdy defensive was a decisive factor in the following success of the attacking battalion. Sergeant Fournier’s selfless concern for his comrades, and intrepidity at the cost of his own life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
HALL, Lewis [posthumously]
Rank and organization: Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army, Company M, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Mount Austen, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, 10 January 1943.
Citation: For gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty. As leader of a machinegun squad charged with the protection of other battalion units, his group was attacked by a superior number of Japanese, his gunner killed, his assistant gunner wounded, and an adjoining guncrew put out of action. Ordered to withdraw from his hazardous position, he refused to retire but rushed forward to the idle gun and with the aid of another soldier who joined him and held up the machinegun by the tripod to increase its field of action he opened fire and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy. While so engaged both these gallant soldiers were killed, but their sturdy defense was a decisive factor in the following success of the attacking battalion. Technician Hall’s selfless concern for his comrades, and intrepidity at the cost of his own life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, an the United States Army.
DAVIS, Charles W.
Rank and organization: Major, United States Army, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Guadacanal Island, 12 January 1943.
Citation: For distinguishing himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy on Guadalcanal Island. On 12 January 1943, Major Davis, then Captain, executive officer of an Infantry Battalion, volunteered to carry instructions to the leading companies of his battalion which had been caught in a cross fire from Japanese machine-guns. With complete disregard for his own safety, he made his way to the trapped units, delivered the instructions, supervised their execution and remained overnight in this exposed position. On the following day, Major Davis again volunteered to lead the assault on the Japanese position which was holding up the advance. When his rifle jammed on its first shot, he drew his pistol and waving his men on, led the assault over the top of the hill. Electrified by his action another group of soldiers followed and seized the hill. The capture of this position broke Japanese resistance and the battalion was then able to proceed and secure the Corps objective. The courage and leadership displayed by Major Davis inspired the entire battalion and unquestionably led to the success of its attack.
PARRISH, Laverne [posthumously]
Rank and organization: Technician 4th Grade, U.S. Army, Medical Detachment, 161st Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Binalonan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 18-24 January 1945.
Citation: He was medical aid man with Company C during the fighting in Binalonan, Luzon, Philippine Islands. On the 18th, he observed 2 wounded men under enemy fire and immediately went to their rescue. After moving 1 to cover, he crossed 25 yards of open ground to administer aid to the second. In the early hours of the 24th, his company, crossing an open field near San Manuel, encountered intense enemy fire and was ordered to withdraw to the cover of a ditch. While treating the casualties, Technician Parrish observed 2 wounded still in the field. Without hesitation he left the ditch, crawled forward under enemy fire, and in 2 successive trips brought both men to safety. He next administered aid to 12 casualties in the same field, crossing and re-crossing the open area raked by hostile fire. Making successive trips, he then brought 3 wounded in to cover. After treating nearly all of the 37 casualties suffered by his company, he was mortally wounded by mortar fire, and shortly after was killed. The indomitable spirit, intrepidity, and gallantry of Technician Parrish saved many lives at the cost of his own. Technician Parrish’s selfless concern for his comrades, and intrepidity at the cost of his own life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
McGAHA, Charles L.
Rank and organization: Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company G, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Near Lupao, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 7 February 1945.
Citation: He displayed conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity. His platoon and 1 other from Company G were pinned down in a roadside ditch by heavy fire from 5 Japanese tanks supported by 10 machineguns and a platoon of riflemen. When 1 of his men fell wounded 40 yards away, he unhesitatingly crossed the road under a hail of bullets and moved the man 75 yards to safety. Although he had suffered a deep arm wound, he returned to his post. Finding the platoon leader seriously wounded, he assumed command and rallied his men. Once more he braved the enemy fire to go to the aid of a litter party removing another wounded soldier. A shell exploded in their midst, wounding him in the shoulder and killing 2 of the party. He picked up the remaining man, carried him to cover, and then moved out in front deliberately to draw the enemy fire while the American forces, thus protected, withdrew to safety. When the last man had gained the new position, he rejoined his command and there collapsed from loss of blood and exhaustion. M/Sgt. McGaha set an example of courage and leadership in keeping with the highest traditions of the service.
COOLEY, Raymond H.
Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U. S. Army, Company B, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.
Place and date: Near Lumboy, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 24 February 1945.
Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his own life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt. Cooley was a platoon guide in an assault on a camouflaged entrenchment defended by machineguns, rifles, and mortars. When his men were pinned down by 2 enemy machineguns, he voluntarily advanced under heavy fire to within 20 yards of 1 of the guns and attacked it with a hand grenade. The enemy, however, threw the grenade back at him before it could explode. Arming a second grenade, he held it for several seconds of the safe period and then hurled it into the enemy position, where it exploded instantaneously, destroying the gun and crew. He then moved toward the remaining gun, throwing grenades into enemy foxholes as he advanced. Inspired by his actions, 1 squad of his platoon joined him. After he had armed another grenade and was preparing to throw it into the second machinegun position, 6 enemy soldiers rushed at him. Knowing he could not dispose of the armed grenade without injuring his comrades, because of the intermingling in close combat of the men of his platoon and the enemy in the melee which ensued, he deliberately covered the grenade with his body and was severely wounded as it exploded. By his heroic actions, S/Sgt. Cooley not only silenced a machinegun and so inspired his fellow soldiers that they pressed the attack and destroyed the remaining enemy emplacements, but also, in complete disregard of his own safety, accepted certain injury and possible loss of life to avoid wounding his comrades.

Campaigns
Central Pacificin WWII
Guadalcanalin WWII
Northern Solomonsin WWII
Luzonin WWII
UN defensive in the Korean War
UN offensive in the Korean War
CCF intervention in the Korean War
First UN counteroffensive in the Korean War
CCF spring offensive in the Korean War
UN summer-fall offensive in the Korean War
Second Korean winter in the Korean War
Korea, summer-fall 1952 in the Korean War
Third Korean winter in the Korean War
Korea, summer 1953 in the Korean War
Counteroffensive in Vietnam
Counteroffensive, Phase II in Vietnam
Counteroffensive, Phase III in Vietnam
Tet Counteroffensive in Vietnam
Counteroffensive, Phase IV in Vietnam
Counteroffensive, Phase V in Vietnam
Counteroffensive, Phase VI in Vietnam
Tet 69 Counteroffensive in Vietnam
Summer-Fall 1969 in Vietnam
Winter-Spring 1970 in Vietnam
Sanctuary Counteroffensive in Vietnam
Counteroffensive, Phase VII in Vietnam

Commanding General (CG)
01.10.1941 Maj.-Gen. Maxwell Murray
29.04.1942 Brig.-Gen Stanley E. Reinhart
08.05.1942 Brig.-Gen. J. Lawton Collins
26.05.1942 Maj.-Gen. J. Lawton Collins
18.12.1943 Brig.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
24.02.1944 Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
12.06.1944 Brig.-Gen William B. Bradford
00.00.0000 Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
01.09.1944 Brig.-Gen William B. Bradford
00.00.0000 Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
03.09.1944 Brig.-Gen. William P. Bledsoe
00.00.0000 Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
22.10.1944 Brig.-Gen. William P. Bledsoe
00.00.0000 Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
11.11.1944 Brig.-Gen. William P. Bledsoe
00.00.0000 Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)
30.06.1945 Brig.-Gen Everett E. Brown
00.00.0000-End of War Maj.-Gen. Charles L. Mullins (Jr.)

Chief of Staff
00.00.0000 Col. Thomas Stark

Other information
Call sign Lightning

Divisional troops Top

Infantry

27th Infantry Regiment Entire War
35th Infantry Regiment Entire War
161st Infantry Regiment 23.07.1942-End of War
298th Infantry Regiment 01.10.1941-23.07.1942

Field Artillery (FA)

Headquarters & Headquarters Battery 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
8th FA Battalion (105mm Howitzer) 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
64th FA Battalion (105mm Howitzer) 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
89th FA Battalion (105mm Howitzer) 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
90th FA Battalion (105mm Howitzer) 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
Band, 25th Divisional Artillery 00.00.0000-01.01.1944

Other troops

Headquarters & Headquarters Company 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
Headquarters Special Troops 12.10.1943-00.00.0000
65th Engineer Combat Battalion 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
25th Mechanized Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop 28.10.1942-00.00.0000
25th Medical Battalion 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
325th Quartermaster Battalion 01.10.1941-01.11.1942
25th Quartermaster Company 01.11.1942-00.00.0000
25th Signal Company 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
725th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
Military Police Platoon 00.00.0000-00.00.0000
Band 01.01.1944-00.00.0000


Attachments Top

Infantry

3rd Battalion, 182nd Infantry Regiment, Americal Division 10.01.1943-09.02.1943
3rd Battalion, 148th Infantry Regiment, 37th Infantry Division 10.08.1943-27.08.1943
3rd Battalion, 145th Infantry Regiment, 37th Infantry Division 11.08.1943-02.09.1943
2nd Battalion, 172nd Infantry Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division 10.09.1943-25.09.1943
148th RCT, 37th Infantry Division 30.04.1945-02.06.1945
126th RCT, 32nd Infantry Division 23.05.1945-30.06.1945


Assignments Top

Date Assigned to Corps Assigned to Army Attached to Army Assigned to Army Group Attached to Army Group
07.12.1941 Hawaiian Department
02.01.1943 XIV Corps        
17.12.1944   Sixth Army      


Detachments Top

Unit Attached to  
Entire Division ISCOM, Guadalcanal 11.07.1943-±16.12.1944
Entire Division I Corps 16.01.1945-15.08.1945
161st Infantry Regiment (reinforced) 37th Infantry Division, XIV Corps 20.07.1943-06.08.1943
35th Infantry Regiment (reinforced) Northern Landing Force, TF 31 00.08.1943-00.00.0000
27th Infantry Regiment (less 1st Battalion) 43rd Infantry Division 15.09.1943-24.09.1943


Command Posts Top

Date Town Region Country
16.01.1945 San Jacinto (2 mile SW) Ticao Island Philippines
19.01.1945 Binalonan Luzon Philippines
30.01.1945 Santa Maria Luzon Philippines
01.02.1945 San Alfonso Luzon Philippines
02.02.1945 La Paz Luzon Philippines
10.02.1945 Mapangpang Luzon Philippines
05.03.1945 Central Luzon Agricultural School (Muñoz) Luzon Philippines
11.03.1945 Puncan Luzon Philippines
28.03.1945 Putlan Luzon Philippines
03.05.1945 Anabat (vicinity) Luzon Philippines
30.06.1945 Tarlac (south) Luzon Philippines

Sources & links: 25th Infantry Division Association
  25th Infantry Division (Light) and United States Army Hawaii
  US Army Center of Military History
  The Generals of World War II
  History of Infantry
  Les Divisions Americaines
  11th Armored Division
  US Army in WWII
  Microsoft Encarta
  Central Luzon State University
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